Optional subtitles: Why should I care? Do I really want to know? Thanks a lot Debbie Downer.

Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of and passionate about food quality and safety.  Not a day goes by that you don’t hear buzz words like “organic”, “GMO”, “hormone-free”, “free range”, etc.  Here in the United States, we have a (relatively) safe and secure supply of food.  However, when that security is compromised, it can be big news:

GMO wheat found in Oregon (2013)

Salmonella (2012) and Listeria (2011) found on cantaloupe

E. coli on salad greens in California (2006)

Over the next few weeks I’d like to talk about another threat that can also sicken humans and animals but doesn’t often receive a lot of press: Mycotoxins.  Mycotoxins are pervasive and fascinating, in my opinion.  However, I did spend much of PhD and post doc studying them…

What is a mycotoxin? “Myco” means fungus and a toxin is a poison; mycotoxins are small compounds produced by some fungi that are harmful to humans and animals in small doses. Symptoms of mycotoxin poisoning in humans and animals are known as mycotoxicoses. Mycotoxins associated with “poisonous mushrooms” are easy enough to avoid (don’t eat them!).  However, mycotoxins are frequently found contaminating food and feed products and are consumed unknowingly.

mycotoxin_katelynwillyerd_wheat

Many species of fungi that produce mycotoxins are also plant pathogens.  As part of their infection and colonization of the plant, they produce these toxins which end up in parts of the plant humans and animals eat. I’ll be profiling specific mycotoxins in the weeks ahead, but (spoiler alert!) some of the crops frequently contaminated with mycotoxins are wheat, corn and peanuts.

Interestingly, we don’t know why fungi produce these toxins.  Hypotheses include antiherbivory (protect a host plant and fungus from being eaten), defense against competitors (a weapon against other fungi or microbes), promotes virulence/aids in causing disease or performs some unknown function in fungal cells.

Stay tuned for more in the Mycotoxin Series.

PS – Fungi are really cool organisms and produce many compounds that have been beneficial for humans, such as dyes, penicillin, statins (for high cholesterol), etc!